Sex after prostate cancer
Try to have persistence and patience

Sexual recovery articles
Erectile dysfunction options

Try not to get discouraged if you don’t see the results you want right away. There are many ways to satisfy your partner other than intercourse.

Sex after prostate cancer can be deeply satisfying, but it may be different than it was before.

If your loved one didn’t have any erection problems before treatment, he was probably able to become aroused without any touching or direct stimulation.

That may change after treatment.


Advertisements


Sexual recovery takes time

It may encourage you to know that a man does not need an erection to have an orgasm.

Much depends on:

  • The type of treatment and whether one or both nerve bundles are removed or damaged
  • Whether a man had erection problems (called erectile dysfunction) prior to treatment
  • Age (impotence may become more of an issue as men get older)

Following a nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy, recovery from impotence generally happens slowly over time.  A man will have dry orgasms (some call it dry sex) because the prostate and seminal vesicles have been removed.

Following radiation therapy, if impotence is a problem, it typically develops over time.

Despite what doctors may tell you, one study showed that it can take up to 4 years for men to see the most improvement in sexual function after prostate cancer surgery.

Don’t give up

Experts say that you should not stop having sex, even if your man is not be able to get or maintain a “stuffable erection” (a lousy term, we know) for sexual intercourse.

It may help to approach sex after prostate cancer treatment:

  • Without any expectations
  • By being open to experimenting
  • By discussing what works and what doesn't
Try not to get discouraged if you don’t see the results you want right away. There are many ways to satisfy your partner other than intercourse.

Helful articles:


Advertisements


Options to help improve erectile dysfunction

If one of these options does not work, you can ask your doctor about trying another.

Updated 8/13



Return to homepage

Discuss information from this website with a medical professional

References:

American Cancer Society. Ways of dealing with sexual problems. http://www.cancer.org. Accessed September 1, 2008.

American Cancer Society. Effects of cancer treatment on male sexuality. http://www.cancer.org. Accessed September 1, 2009.

Rubin Wainrib B, Haber S. Men, Women, and Prostate Cancer. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.;2000.

Walsh PC. Guide to Surviving Prostate Cancer. New York, NY: Time Warner Book Group; 2001. 


Search Site
Custom Search


Search Site
Custom Search


Advertisements













This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.


prostate cancer blogs